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Celebrate

What did you set into motion at the equinox?

March 31, 2011
Maui Weekly

Of course, plants are still making sunlight into Earth-life all around us through a super-humanly-efficient cascade of sub-atomic tumbling and juggling acts that are too speedy for us to see. (But, ooh, do we ever feel this vibrancy when we’re surrounded by it in a forest!)

When you look at the sun, you see it because its light has traveled 93 million miles and is being welcomed by your eyes, courtesy of your photo-receptors—devices invented three billion years ago by cyano-bacteria. Yes, this blue-green being—this mother of all life on Earth—is living on in your eyes, making it possible for you to see the words you’re reading!

If your eyes are on the skies, you’re noticing that our days are growing longer now. We approached, then passed the point in our yearly orbit that folks in the Northern Hemisphere call the Spring Equinox. On March 20, day and night were equal everywhere on Earth. We won’t have this equilibrium again until we reach the opposite side of our yearly orbit on Sept. 22.

Article Photos

When you look at the sun, you see it because its light has traveled 93 million miles and is being welcomed by your eyes, courtesy of your photo-receptors—devices invented three billion years ago by cyano-bacteria. This mother of all life on Earth is living on in your eyes, making it possible for you to see the words you’re reading!

Photo: www.thaigoodview.com

This equinox moment could be a turning point in our culture, just as it is in nature— if we know how to celebrate it. Knowing how means knowing this: When we want to make a change and we’re wise enough to set the change into motion when change is happening naturally anyway, we avoid struggling against the current. We simply ride the waves of nature’s rhythms into a better future. Our word, “celebrate,” means, “to set into motion.”

What did you set into motion at the equinox celebration?

At this pivotal point in our yearly orbit, neither light nor dark had dominion now. We experienced a balance of opposites. Holding this equilibrium in our hearts, we think about the folks who live on the opposite side of our planet. As we see the sun go down in the west, they see it come up in the east. Then, 12 hours later, as we see the sun rise in the east, they see it set in the west.

While we’re facing the setting sun, remember that the sun never rises or sets. It just keeps on shining and we just keep on spinning. What we call “sunset” is actually us spinning into our planet’s shadow. What we call “sunrise” is actually us spinning out of our planet’s shadow, into our sun’s light.

This awareness warms our hearts. Place your hand on your heart, and direct a beam of global equilibrium to the sun. We visualize our beam bouncing off the sun, just as signals bounce off satellites. We visualize our beam being warmly welcomed by our brothers and sisters on the opposite side of the Earth from us.

If you’d like to find out more about the pivotal moments—our equinoxes and solstices—in the rhythms of nature’s time, visit www.primalscience.com.

 
 
 

 

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